Resource Library

Welcome to the Changing Perspectives Resource Library. This resource library is designed to provide educators with summaries and links to other publications and organizations for further reading about a range of topics related to social-emotional learning, differences, diversity, and education. Our hope is to curate resources that you can use for your own learning, share with colleagues and/or parents to support greater awareness, education and practical tools for improving student well-being.

Use the menu on the left to search resources by topic or audience (you may select more than one menu item at a time; search results will include resources that meet all your selected menu items). When selected, a menu item will be highlighted in blue. Click on a blue menu item to de-select it and remove it from your search criteria.

Resources on this page are updated monthly. If you know of a resource we should include, send it to us!

Why Your Brain Loves Kindness

Why Your Brain Loves Kindness

From Mindful.org: "Loving-kindness practices strengthen empathic concern: our ability to care about another person and want to help them."
Why Kindness and Emotional Literacy Matter in Raising Kids

Why Kindness and Emotional Literacy Matter in Raising Kids

From KQED: "While adults may feel that statements like this are pointing out the obvious, we have to remember that kids are at different stages of their development – and that kindness is a character trait that takes both practice and intellectual understanding."
Why High School Students Need Social Emotional Learning

Why High School Students Need Social Emotional Learning

From K-12 Dive: "Our students need more than just academic preparation or career training for life after high school. As they transition to adulthood and independence, their social emotional skills - or lack thereof - will be a critical factor in their success."
Who Do You Call On? Rooting Out Implicit Bias

Who Do You Call On? Rooting Out Implicit Bias

From Edutopia: "...we all have biases of varying kinds. It’s often difficult—and ultimately pointless—to wonder how we acquired them. What matters is to identify them and then work to eliminate those we feel will be harmful to our students’ success."
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